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INSTRUCTIONS FOR SEDATION AND ANESTHESIA

Many of the more complicated oral surgery procedures can now be performed in the office with the aid of I.V. sedation. Commonly referred to as “twilight sleep”, sedation differs from general anesthesia in that you will always be responsive to your environment, even though the chances are you won’t remember much about the procedure.  A local anesthetic is administered to further increase the comfort and safety of the procedure.

For further safety we require:

  • That you have nothing to eat or drink for six hours before the procedure.  If your surgery is to be in the morning, eat or drink nothing upon arising.  If your surgery is planned for the afternoon, you may have clear liquids (soup broth, black coffee, water, apple juice, etc.) for breakfast, then nothing.  If you have had any drug reactions or sensitivities, you must tell your doctor about these, for they may influence the choice of medications.
  •  PLEASE REMOVE ANY FINGER NAIL POLISH OFF OF ONE OF YOUR INDEX FINGERS BEFORE YOUR SURGERY.
  •  A responsible adult must accompany you to the office, remain here while you are having surgery, and drive you home.
  •  Because you will have received sedation medications, your reflexes and level of consciousness will be depressed for several hours after the procedure.  You are not to drive, operate machinery, or be walking by yourself for the remainder of the day.

By following this protocol,  you can confidently approach your surgery knowing that it will be a safe and comfortable procedure.